"too a/an " vs. "a too "

Giganews Newsgroups
Subject: "too <adverb> a/an <noun>" vs. "a too <adverb> <noun>"
Posted by:  Jaakov (j_k_vNOSP…@roNOSPAM.ru)
Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2016

Dear all:

Consider the sentence:

"The existence of a link between depression and too low a level of
omega-3 fatty acids in the body has been indicated in several scientific
studies."

Why not

"The existence of a link between depression and a too low level of
omega-3 fatty acids in the body has been indicated in several scientific
studies."

?

What is the general rule of the position of "too <adverb> a/an <noun>"
vs. "a too <adverb> <noun>"? Is there a difference between AE and BE or
between formal writing, informal writing and oral English?

Thanks in advance,

Jaakov

PS.
Historically, Webster's dictionary from 1817 says
"Underrate, n. too low a price",
"Undervalue, n. a too low value".
The varying positions of the article are weird.

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